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2021 temperature blanket stats

A good-sized throw for his futon lounge or topper for the double bed

I wanted this to be a post with all the details for what is a toasty warm addition to the family now that temperatures have definitely dropped. However, life happens; and the latest happening has derailed things significantly. So, you know, if I give you a general idea, that might have to do. Complete, accurate details would require me to weigh the remaining yarn, then calculate how much of some colours made it into the blanket. I can tell you now, that’s not happening.

For colours and temperature range represented by each, see broad discussion here and below table for details.

Any changes to the original plan were mostly “Let’s not do that” things, dictated by unexpected health setbacks that necessitated a frank and fearless consideration of what could be left out so that YoungB would get his blanket at all (much like this post, actually). There is no “essence of QR code” square, for example. Although I’d planned a double border so that I could incorporate his name and the year, that didn’t happen either. It would have been too time-consuming. I may embroider the year on one of the neutral squares. Then again, I may not.

It was my design, but influenced by the need for solid squares and something that would quickly be square from a circular centre, so that the CJAYG method wouldn’t give me headaches (see discussion). I had assistance with colour choices from both Dr B and YoungB. I’m not sure we got it right in a couple of cases, but, hey, we’re the ones telling the story 🙂

Temperature range ˚CYarn colour (BWM Classic 8 ply) (bought)
≤ 2.9610 – Indian blue: 25g (1 ball)
3.0 – 7.9600 – periwinkle: 200g (1 ball)
8.0 – 12.9777 – powder blue: 200g (3 balls)
13.0 – 17.9745 – pale eucalypt: 300g (3 balls)
18.0 – 22.9695 – guava: 200g (2 balls)
23.0 – 27.9612 – viridian: 350g (3 balls)
28.0 – 32.9769 – marigold: 200g (1 ball)
33.0 – 37.9767 – burnt orange: 50g (1 ball)
38.0 – 42.9608 – holly: 25g (1 ball)
≥ 43.0779 – bright magenta: 50g (1 ball)
Year- and month-end (and CJAYG)694 – maize: 1000g (6 balls)
Planned to include602 – almond: 0g (1 ball)
BORDER DETAILS

Worked in linen/moss stitch,
alternating directions for the 17 rounds of changing colours.

All viridian rounds of linen/moss stitch
worked in same direction.

Final viridian round of htr worked in opposite direction.
marigold – 1 tidying round of (UK) dc
marigold – 2 pattern rounds
periwinkle – 1 pattern round
guava – 4 pattern rounds
pale eucalypt – 2 pattern rounds
powder blue – 1 pattern round
magenta – 3 pattern rounds
burnt orange – 2 pattern rounds
Indian blue – 1 pattern round
viridian – 5 pattern rounds
viridian – finishing round of (UK) htr
Cost of yarn purchased
(24 x 200g balls @ $13.50)
$324.00
Cost of yarn usedNot calculated, but probably around $250.00
Hours of work> 400
Yarn orders1 Jan 2021 – 8 balls = $108.00
1 each of: maize, pale eucalypt, almond, powder blue, Indian blue, viridian, burnt orange, bright magenta
9 Feb 2021 – 4 balls = $54.00
1 each of periwinkle, guava, marigold, holly
29 May 2021 – 2 balls = $27.00
2 balls of maize
13 Oct 2021 – 10 balls = $135.00
3 of maize
2 each of viridian, pale eucalypt, powder blue
1 of guava
Entirely unused at completion: 200g almond, 200g pale eucalypt and leftovers, 200g powder blue and leftovers; about 200g of viridian; and quite a lot of the holly, which wasn’t used in the border.
Temperatures represented by colour range; and yarn usage

I chose hook sizes to ensure that the completed blanket was “not too holey”. I’d usually use a 4.00mm hook for 8-ply yarn. I used a 3.50mm hook for the centre and middle rows, to provide that requested firm, not-too-holey fabric. I used a 4.00mm hook for the joining round, which gave overall better drape on the entire blanket, and made it easier for me to do the joins, but – again – met the “not too holey” requirement.

I went back to the 3.50mm hook for the linen stitch border, again so that the fabric would be firm, and to prevent rippling; or at least keep that to a minimum. Working rounds in alternating directions also helped to minimise rippling. I worked most of the viridian rounds in the same direction, as that was easier for keeping joins tidy. It was also easier to see what I was doing.

The parts that were fairly dull and boring were all those damn winter squares. Just like the weather! Although generally there are remarkably few special design features, I know a few crept in through those cooler colours. I was tired and not always counting as well as I should have been. I rescued most, and even I would be hard put to find the few that remain.

I got great value out of the mantra that CJAYG and tidying ends as you go allow: when it’s done, it’s finished. There are no ends to sew in, other than the one you’ve just snipped for the border.

As noted above, there were several unexpected derailments because of equally unexpected ill health. All in all, it’s a fine testament to a great deal of dedication and devotion, and an astonishing degree of crafting monogamy. I made one other crocheted project – a small wind spinner – and didn’t bother to have any knitting on the go At. All. Yes, I’m surprised, too.

In sum: did it turn out as well as I’d hoped? Yes, and perhaps better than I’d imagined. Would I make another such thing? Probably not! Would I used the yarn again? Of course. Bendigo Woollen Mills Classic 8-ply remains one of my favourite yarns, particularly valuable for being machine washable.

I now have a long list of beanies for babies and toddlers, and perhaps a little blanket or two and some adult beanies, and a few acrylic squares that I’ll donate for someone else to turn into a charity blanket at a nearby hospital, not to mention an unexpected adult beanie to replace one that sidled from one head to another as a loan and then, well, stayed on the new head! That seems to happen quite frequently with beanies.

I hope your crafting is keeping you warm and cosy if you’re in a chilly part of the world. 🙂

 
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Posted by on July 16, 2022 in Crochet

 

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comparing modalities

That represents a lot more work than you’d think 🙂

During lulls in the technological efficiency, I occasionally pick up the blanket and work a stitch or three of the border. It is looking good, but there’s definitely a very l-o-n-g way to go. I’m enjoying the linen stitch/moss stitch. As a knitter, I find it more similar to knitted linen stitch. I recognise that the chain 1 is approximately equal to the slip 1. I don’t as readily see it resembling knitted moss stitch, except in its reversibility. That’s a distinct plus.

Whatever you call it, it’s effective. The border at that point garnered praise from a knitter friend who has stalled on her large project (a wondrous blanket that makes mine look very ho-hum indeed). I would have stalled, too, I think, had I not decided Most Firmly from the outset that I would not do anything else until the temperature blanket was finished. I’ve been pretty good about that.

With that in mind, and as my computer has just given me one of those, “I’m going to shut down on you,” messages, I’m off to do a spot more work on that border.

I hope your dedication is also holding in the face of temptation 😀

 
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Posted by on April 20, 2022 in Crochet, Knitting

 

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