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Tag Archives: men’s cabled jumper

this old thing?

Today we’re experiencing chilly, wintry weather. It’s cold. It’s wet. It’s “sit in front of the fire with a hot chocolate and a good book” time. Oh, and, you know, bring out your warmest woollies. In my case that would be my very old, cabled, red jumper; the one I knitted in 1984 prior to departing for the northern hemisphere. There I wore it solidly from almost the day I arrived till the day I departed. It certainly features in many photos from those years, including this one among the ruins near Nonno’s village.

1984-11-25 Roviano Lazio Italy

YoungB looked at me wearing it today – yes, it’s somewhat tighter nowadays, in case you were wondering 😉 – commented on how warm I looked, and asked was I knitting anything for him! Uuh, yeah, about that. I reminded him that he’d changed his mind about the cabled jumper I’d planned to knit for him and then been unable to decide on anything else. Also, cables? In those days they weren’t his favourite adornment. He’s lived in a truly cold climate since then and has come to appreciate cables as providing visual interest as well as extra warmth.

Also, he reminded me, I’m mending his fingerless mitts. He loves them and has worn them so much that he’s gone through the palm of one. I often say he’s knitworthy  and worth the food. How could I resist making something for someone who’s so wholeheartedly appreciative?!

If you’re in a cool part of the world, I hope you’re managing to keep warm, whether by sitting in front of the fire or from wearing something lovingly handknitted.

 
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Posted by on August 11, 2018 in Knitting, Travel

 

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annual cycle of feast or famine

Still going, though perhaps not strong. I made it in 1988.

Dr B’s cabled jumper is still going, though perhaps not strong. I made it in 1988.

You know how it is. After the busy-ness dies down and life gets back to normal, you want to knit, but don’t have a project in mind. You can’t quite bring yourself to get back into the swing of tinking the existing projects (there are several, as I said last time). And then, into your email inbox – right on cue, just like last year – pops some irresistible temptation from Bendigo. Last year it was sock yarn that lured me. This year, it’s their latest, lovely, special yarn. The variegated colourways are attractive and there’s a black-grey mix. YoungB’s birthday jumper – in some pattern suited to the yarn, of course, not the original choice over which he dithered so much I gave up – looks like a winning option again. Quickly, before you change your mind, you dig out a fast, easy pattern and order the yarn. Well, that’s what I did, anyway.

Then Dr B and YoungB returned from visiting a friend, who continues to be remarkably impressed by the – now very old and falling to pieces, but too nice to throw out – jumper I made for Dr B during the first year we were married, and which he still wears because he loves it. As you can see, it’s riddled with cables, albeit at the lower end of complexity. Otherwise you die of boredom. Right? It is a nice jumper and I think it’s beginning to influence YoungB (who once refused to borrow it for a ski trip because of the cables; but who’s now experienced a truly chilly, Northern-hemisphere winter and has doubtless seen others wearing handmade jumpers of similar design).

YoungB then suggested that he’d quite like a beanie. With cables on it. I hauled out my trusty old Patons Book 483 Winter Warmers that I’ve been using for ever, and showed him a couple of patterns. He chose a Fair Isle one, pattern 17, as well as one with cables, pattern 18, after also considering pattern 22, which is the one I made for Dr C a couple of years ago. He and I shuffled off to our LYS to choose some yarn. I’ve been knitting for enough years to know that, as long as you buy reasonable quality yarn and ensure that it’s all from the same manufacturer – as well as the obvious colour and dye-lot matches, if it’s a single-colour buy – then you don’t have to buy the yarn specified. After looking at and comparing several different brands of pure-wool yarns, we picked out four different shades of blue for the Fair Isle beanie, and a grey wool and alpaca mix for the cabled number (I see it more as an obvious grey, he sees it as having a strong teal hue).

Now all I have to do is think of something quick and appropriate that I can make for a colleague’s birthday on Thursday, though I’ll start the knitting immediately and, fnigres corsesd, hope that I don’t get too many interruptions. Realistically, I’m likely to come to grief on the jumper but it IS a quick and easy pattern. The beanies will take time, but when you commute for the best part of three hours, five days a week, then time is not your main problem. It’s finding the dedication. Given that YoungB specifically asked for a beanie, and chose the pattern and yarn himself, then I dare say the dedication will be easier to find than it often is.

Have you reached the annual point where you simply have to have some knitting to keep you sane?

 
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Posted by on April 3, 2016 in Knitting

 

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but there’ll be snow

I was lying awake last night thinking that, if YoungB is in Italy during winter, he’ll get as much snow as even he could hope for. I was also thinking that he’ll certainly need a warm, woollen jumper. A handknitted one would be ideal. It occurred to me that I might have to – nay; should! – push his cabled number (from this book) up the queue and start knitting soon so that he can take that with him. One of the [many] things I like about cabled patterns is that they provide good focus points to keep you knitting: “I’ll just finish this part of the pattern before I go to bed,” that sort of thing. (Six months to knit a jumper I’d planned to do slowly over three years? Mm, yeah, that doesn’t sound at all ambitious, specially with all that other knitting I’m supposed to be doing as well.)

The first cabled jumper I ever made was for myself. I was probably 21 or 22, certainly no older. Back in those days, I knitted on the bus (I truly think the seating was less restrictive because I don’t recall being worried about bumping those in neighbouring seats) and at work (there was no lunchroom but I’d sit at my desk and knit during breaks). I’d knit from one cable row to another during the day – plain stuff on the bus and probably at work – then I’d get home and do the pattern row, possibly two lots, and it was surprising how quickly that jumper seemed to knit itself. I wore it for years. I knitted a similar one for Dr B a few years later. The pattern I’ve picked out for YoungB will require more concentration (it has a greater number of, and more complex, cables than my first venture into such realms, as well as being a larger size) and, if I’m to finish it in time, a great deal more dedication than I usually give to knitting projects.

Of course, the very first thing I’ll need to do is order the yarn – and, you know, because of all those cables, it will be lots of yarn – from my favourite supplier. Ah, that sounds like a great start to a new year, don’t you think?

 
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Posted by on January 7, 2014 in Knitting

 

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