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Tag Archives: Murano yarn

getting round to things

Eldest Niece's mitts have finally left my hands and I hope they'll soon be keeping hers warm.

Eldest Niece’s mitts have finally left my hands and I hope they’ll soon be keeping hers warm.

Today, the Aunts, two of the Nieces and I joined a fundraising walk, a gentle 4 Km circuit beginning and ending at a beachside venue familiar to me from the occasional Audax Christmas dinner. I don’t think any of us came remotely close to working up a sweat. No matter. We did it and enjoyed ourselves. Also, it provided an opportunity for me to hand over Youngest Niece’s birthday cowl (crocheted using Moda Vera Ambruni yarn) as well as the fingerless mitts for Eldest Nephew (knitted using Country Tartan 8 ply yarn) and Eldest Niece (photographed above and knitted using Bendigo’s Murano yarn, nominally an 8 ply). Middle Niece is pondering her options and will probably put in an order for one or the other article for her birthday in June 🙂

Meanwhile, I’m about four stitches away from completion of unpicking the sticky beanie (knitted using Moda Vera Bouvardia yarn) and hope to be back on the knitting of it by tonight (the four stitches are where I’ve woven in the ends, so I’m finding them particularly tricky). I won’t complete it tonight but it will only take a couple of evenings of work (it’s knitted in the round so there’s no seaming to contend with) to have it where it needs to be: ready for popping in the post to the friend whose head it’s intended to cover. Then, and I’ve promised myself it will be only then, I can make a start on some socks for Dr B.

And that’s as much of a plan as I can wrap my head around at the moment. Work is manically busy and we continue to have computer problems on the home front. I hope you’re faring better, whatever your weather and whatever you’re getting round to 🙂

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they weren’t meant to be mine

What cold weather will do to good intentions? See you pilfer mitts intended for someone else :)

What cold weather will do to good intentions? See you pilfer mitts intended for someone else 🙂

That cold Easter Monday I mentioned and the “now I have some of my own” Murano mitts to which I alluded? Uuh, yeah, it was genuinely cold and neither Dr B nor I could get warm. We were both doing some computer work. He reached for the colourful mitts I’d made him using Jester yarn (Ravelled but not yet blogged). Me? Well, I pinched some.

Over the years, I’ve made something like 15 pairs of fingerless mitts for other people and some for myself that have ended up being given away. These weren’t meant to be mine. I made them for someone else. But, as they were meant to be a surprise, the intended recipient won’t know I’ve pinched them. And I really, truly can and will make her another pair.

In the meantime, I have warm, comfortable fingers while I type and, believe me, that’s a first 🙂 Bendigo’s Murano to the fore again, this time in a lovely shades-of-purple colourway (it looks blue but it’s definitely purple).

Just call me the yarn thief 🙂

 
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Posted by on April 12, 2015 in Knitting

 

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a good afternoon’s work

Two afternoons, really, and there's still a thumb to finish

Two afternoons, really, and there’s still a thumb to finish

Hello, again, I hope you had an enjoyable Easter weekend? Ours was sunny and delightful until Monday. Then the temperature dropped (so much so that we caved in and turned on our space heater) and the skies opened. It was cold. It was wet. There was hail. Winter announced its loud arrival. Of course, today has been warm and sunny 🙂

Given the combination of unfriendly weather and a public holiday, if you had fingerless mitts with a looming deadline, wouldn’t you have stoked them up while watching La Terra Trema? (Not the best choice, because I really needed to read the subtitles!) I did and made one mitt. This afternoon I’ve knitted the second one to the point where all I have to do is 10 very short rows on that second thumb. Nothing to it. Then it’s on with the blocking and Eldest Niece should have them for her birthday.

Once again, I’m using Bendigo Woollen Mills’ Murano yarn, this time leftovers from the beanie I made for Dr C way back when. It’s perhaps not the best yarn for something like this, in the sense that it has a tendency to felt and it pills something dreadful after a few wears – meaning that it might not be as long-lasting as a harder-wearing yarn like Cleckheaton’s Country Tartan – but the colourways are such fun and the resulting mitts certainly very warm (I finally have some for myself).

The next question is, should I make a shopping bag to accompany them or just gift-wrap them in paper instead?

 
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Posted by on April 11, 2015 in Knitting

 

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just more fingerless mittens

Already old and well-loved in 2010

Already old and well-loved in 2010

You see those pretty blue mitts? They’re knitted with acrylic yarn to Twinset Ellen’s pattern and were originally intended for me. But the pair I’d made for YoungB having stretched so much they were almost too big for Dr B, the blue pair – logically and obviously – went to a worthier home. Cheap and acrylic though the yarn might be, it’s wearing well and still keeping YoungB’s hands warm in Italy.

Modelled by Dr B but now gracing YoungB's smaller hands

Modelled by Dr B but now gracing YoungB’s smaller hands

And that second pair? Ravelled here, for full details. YoungB admired those I was making for Eldest Aunt’s retirement present, so I made a similar pair for him: same yarn, same needle size, same stocking stitch base pattern, though I added a couple of panels of ribbing for his, and same thumb treatment. The larger number of stitches meant that his stripes came closer to matching and I knitted the body of both mitts before doing either of the thumbs to ensure that. YoungB says these are fantastic. He’s a great recipient, always appreciative; which is probably why I didn’t mind giving him the blue pair in the first place 🙂

 
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Posted by on March 26, 2015 in Knitting

 

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if not winning, then certainly grinning

You’ve probably noticed how erratically I’ve been blogging. That’s been largely because I’ve had no desktop computer for the best part of a year. Tonight I’m back on a desktop computer; my own, what’s more. This is a reality too wonderful to contemplate so it’s a good thing that there are downsides such as a very sticky keyboard – that’s been swapped already – and quite the wrong workstation to accommodate the new machine.

The experience of being without a computer for such a long time leads me to observe that, when you can’t use your computer, you end up not doing a lot of work that you should be doing, which is occasionally close to disastrous. On the other hand, if you knit and crochet, you end up doing a lot of crocheting and knitting and I have been: several crocheted cowls and six pairs of knitted, fingerless mitts (at last count). The mitts – using a variety of yarns but predominantly Bendigo’s Murano – have garnered particular admiration and a rash of requests for made-to-order birthday presents. “Please?” Eldest Niece asked in a very winning way. I like it when people ask for something I can manage that I know they’ll use and enjoy. Not having a computer for so long wasn’t a win in most respects but I am at least grinning because I can truthfully say that I’m doing quite well with my not-a-New-Year’s-resolution to spend more time being creative.

Next step, sorting out photos! Wish me luck.Or do you think I should step away from that for another year?

 
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Posted by on March 12, 2015 in Crochet, Knitting

 

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party pooper

The last time Karen hosted a Pyjama Party Sewalong, I finished mine in time but was defeated by technology when it came to showcasing photos of same. This year? I was going so well! All cameras charged and functioning, computers working OK most of the time. I’d bought the fabric, laundered it and even ironed it (yes, that’s quite possibly what caused any recent seismic disturbances in this part of the world). I had it laid out on my sewing table with the pattern and everything, all ready to cut out. It’s a pattern I’ve used on numerous previous occasions, so I knew the actual sewing wouldn’t take long at all. But then? Then we had unexpected visitors from interstate – a delightful couple of busy days, but although some knitting might have happened when I wasn’t driving, I certainly wasn’t able to do any sewing – and that was that. So, really, I think that had better be that. No more parties for me. I obviously can’t be relied on to do anything in time!

That’s not to say that, in between feeling very glum about the whole employment scene and not wanting to waste blog time moaning about same, I haven’t been busy. I’ve finally finished Youngest Uncle’s fingered mitts/fingerless gloves (at this time of year, good, natural light for sewing can be in short supply but the need for the finished article quite pressing, especially now that Youngest Uncle is home from a tropical holiday). I’ve knitted a beanie for myself. And I really am about 99% done with Middle Niece’s Easy Lace Cowl.

I ended up making Youngest Uncle’s fingerless gloves/fingered mitts using a knit-it-flat-then-sew-it-up pattern from the Patons Winter Warmers Book 483. It’s pattern 37, Knitted Family Gloves or Mitts. I used Cleckheaton Country Tartan yarn, which knits up beautifully, and made the Man’s size. I’m happy with the results and I’m sure Youngest Uncle will be too (I’ll be delivering them tomorrow).

Test-driven by Dr B, whose hands are very large. They'll certainly fit Youngest Uncle.

Test-driven by Dr B, whose hands are very large. They’ll certainly fit Youngest Uncle.

And, as I said, I knitted a beanie for myself. Strictly speaking, when I said the colours of that balaclava weren’t my colours, I was wrong. The colours are fine but those particular shades are perhaps not quite dark enough for me. On the other hand, although the beanie sports a similar colour palette, the shades are much darker; in fact, a little too dark for me. But let me remind you of YoungB’s witty wisdom that any colour is your colour when you’re cold. I’ve been wearing this beanie and loving how warm it is.

Cheerful, self-striping yarn again but this time a slightly flatter crown than my previous beanie

Cheerful, self-striping yarn again but this time a slightly flatter crown than my previous beanie

You won’t be surprised to hear that this pattern also comes from the Patons Winter Warmers Book 483. This time I used pattern 15, Knitted Cap and Scarf. I made the Lady’s size, used Bendigo Woollen Mills’ Murano and didn’t bother with the striping (given that the yarn provided that anyway). Once again, I loved the yarn but was disappointed that there was a knot. And this time, I didn’t see the knot coming, so ended up having to tink half a row. Oh, well, no biggie. At least I wasn’t knitting anything complex.

So that’s what I’ve been doing. I hope you’ve been keeping busy, too?

 
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Posted by on June 26, 2013 in Knitting, Sewing

 

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this one is for me

Those from truly chilly climes can stop reading now, but anyone who considers temperatures below 10 degrees cold enough to need a good beanie will understand why I’ve decided that, no matter what else I knit, I have to knit a decent beanie for myself. It’s not that I’ve never had one. Why, I remember knitting any number of decent beanies back in the 70s – photos from winter beach holidays provide evidence of all the younger fry happily sporting such made-by-me items – and at least one of them must have been for me. I had a silly one that I knitted to take to Italy, where I knew it was going to be damn cold and I was right; minus 22 will do your head in nicely if it’s not covered. It was made from a collection of leftover wool and had a matching scrappy pompom made specially by one of my patients. I loved that beanie and the pompom (because of its provenance), but I couldn’t say for sure what happened to it. It might have been lost in one of the many moves. Or Dr B, who hated it and hasn’t a humorous bone in his body, might have surreptitiously disposed of it.

I’ve made lots of quick, acrylic beanies for YoungB and a balaclava for myself in the meantime and they’ve done the job well enough most of the time. Even unique, labelled beanies will disappear from child care (a couple of YoungB’s hadnknitted beanies did), so I wasn’t anxious to use good yarn that would benefit others. Sorry if that’s selfish, but I was cranky enough about having things stolen (the children might easily have mixed things up but the adults would have known what did and didn’t belong to their own child; and the adults could easily have read the identifying nametag). I didn’t need to feel angry as well about the yarn involved! I used wool for YoungB’s first balaclava, but we agreed that by then he was old enough to speak out in defence of his ownership and that the balaclava probably wouldn’t be a casualty; nor was it. We still have it.

On my own behalf, I’ve been accustomed to working in airconditioned buildings where I haven’t had to worry greatly about my head being cold, so the walk to and from from the bus was about as much as I needed to consider and therefore my acrylic balaclava, worn down as a proper balaclava or rolled up and worn as a beanie, did the job. That’s no longer the case and I changed my mind very quickly the other day when I was out on a long walk, wearing a little acrylic beanie I’d made for YoungB some years back – I have a small head, so the size difference was negligible – and feeling distinctly that something wasn’t working. My ears were cold!

Having enjoyed the results of recent beanies knitted with decent yarn, I last night cast on one for myself in some more of Bendigo Woollen Mills’ Murano yarn, this time in shade 021, a blue/green/purple mix. They’re definitely my sorts of colours (not only appealing to me but also quite good with my greying blonde hair and accompanying fair complexion). Just for variety, however, as well as speediness, I decided that this time rather than a fancy pattern with cables I’d use pattern 15 from Paton’s Book 483 as my basis. It’s a fairly plain ribbed affair, getting its fun element from stripes but it’s a slightly different shape from others I’ve made recently. Because the yarn I’m using is self-striping, I’m just ribbing to the point where the pattern says to start stocking stitch. And, you know, it has a pompom. We’ll see about that. I might make one. Then again, I might not.

The question, really, is whether or not I can finish it in time for tomorrow’s early morning walk around the rowing course.

 
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Posted by on June 16, 2013 in Knitting

 

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